Some updates

Danielle and I were just laughing because she sent me an email from her client (GoodNites) about a free confidential conference call about bedwetting they're sponsoring with an expert tomorrow (Thursday in North/South America) and then discovered that yesterday's post was about bedwetting, and the reader even mentioned GoodNights. Ha. Anyway, here are the details of the call:

"The client is GoodNites, the disposable sleep boxers and sleep shorts for children who have issues with bedwetting. Our original plan was to reach out to bloggers who are talking about their struggles with bedwetting (with advice and free product), but when we did a conversation audit, we were very surprised to find out that NO ONE is blogging about it.

This is kind of upsetting, because as we all know, the best source of information for moms is from other moms. If no mom bloggers are talking about bedwetting, then the only sources of information are on product websites and on medical sites like WebMD.

So, what we are offering up is a conference call this Thursday at 2pm CST. The call will be with Judsen Culbreth (her bio is below). She will answer any questions that anyone has about bedwetting, and can offer up both professional and personal experience and advice. The call is anonymous, we are just asking participants to register via a completely confidential email to an account we have set up. They can also submit questions via the email, and we will pass those on to Judsen. Also, we are inviting any bloggers to the call who aren't facing the issue, but would like to educate their readers. Oh, and if you want to pass on questions for readers who might feel embarrassed to email them, you can invite them to post them in your comments, if you like.

Again, the call is this Thursday, September 20th at 2pm CST. To get the dial-in information, just send an email to parentchat@edelman.com.

Judsen's Bio:
Judsen Culbreth is a mother, parenting expert and author with both professional and personal experience on the topic bedwetting.  Formerly Editor-in-Chief of Working Mother magazine and Executive Editor at Redbook, Judsen's editorial work has been honored with many awards, including two Parents' Choice Silver Honor Awards.  Culbreth has also appeared on hundreds of TV and radio news programs, including NBC's Today show, CBS Evening News, ABC's Prime Time Live and CNN."

2 CST is 3 on the East Coast of the US and Canada, and noon on the West Coast. Check the world clock to find out what time it is where you are. If you don't want to email in a question you can leave it in the comments here anonymously.

Heather writes:

"Even though I'm only an aunt I read your stuff daily, especially about PPD which I am scared of.  I've bookmarked you series and already told my husband that when the time comes he is in charge of everything in those articles.

Imagine my surprise as I was watching Good Eats on the Food Network tonight and saw him rework rice crispy treats in a way that made me think of you {it was the flax oil that did it for me}.  I thought maybe your readers {who aren't hopelessly addicted to Alton Brown & Good Eats} might like it."

Recipe for Brown Rice Crispy Bar from Alton Brown at www.FoodTV.com

(For those who don't want to click, the ingredients are puffed brown rice, flax seed oil, honey, mini marshmallows, slivered almonds, dried cranberries, dried cherries, and dried blueberries.)

"Only an aunt," pshaw. Anyone who's interested in kids is welcome here. As for these bars, though, well, I love flax seed oil more than most, but I don't think I could go this far. The flax seed oil and dried fruit would be great for postpartum moms (the dried fruit has a lot of great fiber), but this recipe reminds me of the stuff my mom used to try to pass off to us when I was a kid. (I have lots of memories of going to co-op breakdown day to divide the huge bags of carob chips and wheat germ into packets for the individual families. Good times.) Even the lack of raisins doesn't make me want to try it. I'd eat the dried blueberries by themselves, though.

And now for an anticlimactic update on my Kindergarten situation: I still don't like the teacher and don't trust her as far as I can throw her, but she seems to think my son is kind of funny so she's being nice to him. I worry that if what my son says is true, the teacher is scapegoating another kid in the class (call me crazy but I don't think a 5-year-old should be sent out of the classroom three times in the first three weeks of school unless the behavior is violent or seriously disruptive). I'm still going to talk to the principal, but it may be more of a general "what's really going on with her?" session than a "help my kid" session.

He was fine about going to school yesterday, but then freaked out when it was time for me to leave, and wouldn't go back into his room for awhile. But at least he wasn't sobbing uncontrollably like before.

Things I don't want to have happen that have happened to different people in my family: Skip a grade and still end up the smart ostracized kid only younger than everyone else to boot, sit in the back of the room bored reading the dictionary until the teacher yells at you and moves the dictionary too high for you to reach (although you end up with a stellar vocabulary up through the letter H), be told by your kindergarten teacher that you're too "wild" for school (because you have boy energy) so you barely graduate from high school because you believe her, mentally tune out from school from Kindergarten on because there's nothing for you there, be told you're so smart so often that you end up afraid to take any risks because everyone's invested in your success.

That's what I'm afraid of, not a little boredom. And there are a bunch of reasons we didn't end up in a GATE program this year. Once of which was that I felt I was going to be able to trust a Kindergarten teacher, because all the K teachers I've ever known have been resourceful, smart about little kids, and kind. I'm pretty gobsmacked by my instant mistrust of this teacher (I have to say that everyone else at the school had been great).

Jenni, I didn't go in telling her he could read because the teacher and former-teacher commenters here told me not to (not me specifically, but parents) a few weeks ago. They said that teachers figure out the kids quickly anyway, and don't need or want the parents to bring their own prejudgments into it. I was surprised that she hadn't picked up on the fact that my son's reading fluently, especially in light of this whole "read at all costs" thing they've got going with the forced reading at the beginning of class.

Speaking of that, I'm finally getting my routine down so I'm not as frazzled in the morning. My son is insisting on school lunch ("I don't know what it was but it tasted good!" Help...me...) and doesn't eat anything I pack him ("I ate one grape tomato, Mom!"). So I don't have to pack him anything. My babysitter meets us at school and takes the little one. But still, the whole set-up is basically for the birds. And I'm still pissed about all the school supplies (it's not like we can all just pile into the car and stop at Target--it required at least two stores for that list).

How are you guys?