The real real 22-month-old can’t sleep post

This post has been eaten three times now so I’m scared to hit post again, but here goes…

Amanda writes:

“I’m stumped, and I’m losing it.  My 22-month-old son, always a
not-great napper but a great night sleeper, is involved in some kind of
horrible backslide.  

He’s always been an early riser, but lately he’s been getting up at 4:30-5:00,
for about 3 months. We sleep in a basement, so it’s very very dark and
he has no way of knowing when it’s morning. There also isn’t enough
light for him to sit and play in his crib.  He’s up at 5 and READY TO
GO.  In desperation sometimes, we let him sleep with us in the rocking
chair for an extra hour, but he’s getting too big now and I’m trying to
break him of it.

We’ve always had trouble with naps.  A few
months ago, I gave up and was sleeping with him for his naps–it was
good, since I got rest (I’m pregnant with my second).  But now I’ve
realized I can’t commit to it forever, especially not with an infant on
the way.  We trained, and it was a textbook four days– hour of
screaming, 40 mins, 20 mins no screaming.  It lasted about a week.  Now
he’s refusing again, and the last few days he’s screaming for a full
hour, no signs of sleep.  After the hour we just get him up, and then
he’s exhausted and cranky until bedtime.

His day looks like this:

wake at 5:00

down for “nap”: 1:00

bed: 7:30

He
goes down fine at night, but wakes three and four times a night whining
or crying (not hysterical, not afraid), but wanting to rock in the
chair or sleep with someone.  Usually with a pat he goes back down
easily, but wakes again a couple of hours later for more of the same.

  • He’s not hungry: often won’t want to eat until 9 a.m.
  • He has water in his crib if he wants it.
  • He has an aquarium he can turn on if he wants some light
  • He has a consistent bed and nap routine that has been the same since he was 6 weeks old.
  • Temperature in his room is consistent
  • His diet hasn’t changed
  • As far as we can tell, he’s not sick or teething
  • He snores, so his mattress is propped up at the head

Some thoughts:

  • he’s going almost 8 hours between waking and nap.  Is this too long?  Is overtired/awake time still a thing at this age?
  • We haven’t told him outright about the baby (it’s early yet),
    but people are talking about it around him and he’s very smart.  Is he
    maybe sensing something? Do I smell different?
  • I’ve heard of ignoring until 6 am, but how does that work?  Does their body just suddenly learn what 6 feels like?  Today he screamed from 4:30-5:30.
  • Is he too young for one of those “ok to wake” clocks?  I thought
    that might help.  He’s good with logic (as much as a toddler can be), so
    maybe the image of sleep time and awake time will help?

We are losing our minds– we live
in very close quarters and we hear every sound he makes.  I’m a SUPER
wimp about CIO, and I’m just at my wits’ end about how to fix this. 

Please. pretty please.  I’m trying my best to do everything right, and I’m failing at this.  Help!”

Oh,
no! You are not failing. And please, please don’t try to do everything
right–that’s an impossible goal. No parent can ever do everything
right. And even if you could, it wouldn’t be worth it. Kids need to know
their parents as people. Flawed, loving people. Not robots. So just be
who you are and stay connected to your kid.

Now, I’ve got nothing on the early waking thing. In the
almost-eight years I’ve been writing Ask Moxie, the waking at 5 am phase
is the only thing we’ve never come close to cracking. So the only thing
I can say is that he’ll eventually grow out of it.

The list of things you’ve already eliminated is
impressive. You hit everything I’d have told you to look at, especially
his diet (particularly artificial colors/flavors/sweeteners and gluten)
and teething. This sounds like general bodily discomfort that isn’t
letting his body fall or stay asleep, either night or day. Diet and
teething are the two things that directly cause bodily discomfort, but
it’s not either of those.

This also sounds like a sleep regression or developmental
stage, but it’s smack in the middle of the period right between the
18-month regression and the 24-month regression. So unless he’s a kid
who hits developmental stuff off the usual schedule (and I’m assuming
he’s not or you would have mentioned it), it’s not a typical regression.

So what else? It definitely seems like something’s just
not letting him stay asleep. Learning some new kind of movement? (But
for three full months?) Reflux? (But the times he’s waking and the fact
that he doesn’t want to eat when he wakes up don’t align with typical
patterns.)

 

Readers, what am I missing?

37 thoughts on “The real real 22-month-old can’t sleep post”

  1. I’m not sure what I would do about the night sleep, except CIO, but I would try putting him down for his nap at 12:00 and see if that helps. He’s probably overtired by 1:00.

  2. I agree with the nap shifting, and I might even go so far as to try some pre-emptive Tylenol at bedtime to see if it helps him sleep through at least the first wake. Some kids are very sensitive to even low levels of discomfort when they are tired.

  3. Try 2 blankets, one below the sheet in his cot and one on top of him. Our daughter was waking continually then snuggling back to sleep with us in a similar fashion to your son and it took us months to figure out she was actually cold. I also read somewhere (here?) that if the child wakes at the same time each night it’s a habit and if they wake at different times its in response to stimuli. Good luck figuring it out!

  4. Is it possible that the whole problem — the naps, the morning wakings, and all — is that he’s overtired? 7:30 – 5:00 with minimal/infrequent naps is only 9.5 hours. That seems very, very low for a kid that age. (One possible explanation: http://www.ahaparenting.com/ask-the-doctor-1/how-to-lengthen-over-tired-20-month-olds-nap). My kiddo was also generally a good night sleeper & poor napper, and when she went through phases where the naps were really bad it did bleed into night sleep.

    With that in mind, the first thing I’d try might be to move bedtime back significantly for a week or so — as early as 6:00, if I could swing it with the rest of my schedule — and see what happened.

  5. I put my son to bed a little later when he started waking up at 5:30. I know the doctor and others have said that shouldn’t matter. But putting him to bed between 8 and 8:30 has led to a 6:30 wake up most mornings. Also at daycare, they give him lunch at 11:30 and naptime from 12ish – 2ish pm. He does seem more refreshed generally and is sleeping better…

  6. I’d hate to say it, but I think CIO might be your best option. We fought doing this with our first until we were about to die from sleep deprivation and it really was the only thing that worked. I found that some kids don’t like waking up alone and figure out if they make a lot of noise someone eventually comes. The only way to get the message through that this behaviour was not tolerated was to just ignore them.

    One other thing that worked really well with our first was to put a light on a timer and call it his "sleeping light". When it was on, he was to be in bed, quiet. Once it turned off he was allowed to come out of his room and/or be louder. We did CIO with our first at around 9 months but once he was out of the crib it all went to hell again until we instituted the sleeping light. It worked really, really well.

  7. Our daughter (also 22 months) just likes to be with us. We both work full time and don’t see her as much as we’d like to, so it’s possible he’s simply waking up and feeling lonely/ alone, even in close quarters? She sleeps fine with us but not so well on her own. Our "solution" (what we’re living with because we’d rather have sleep than an independently sleeping toddler) is to put her to bed in her "room" (more of an alcove we need to walk through to get to our room) at 8:00 (won’t actually sleep till closer to 9), and if/ when she wakes in the middle of the night, either attempt to get her back to bed if she only needs a pat or a sip of water (sometimes she can’t find the sippy cup even though it’s there with her) or bring her to our bed if it takes longer than that. She she snuggles in and generally is fine for the rest of the night.
    Having the ipad and a snack right by the bed buy us another half hour in the morning on weekends. On weekdays I get up before she does.
    Good luck!!!

  8. Oh, also, try moving his bed time 15 minutes earlier every night until he’s down at 6:30 and see if that helps. You’re right in the age where kids have started dropping their 2nd nap but really still need it, so they’re going to bed overtired which messes things up mid-evening.

  9. If your child is snoring, you might want to get him checked out for sleep apnea. I am not sure how well he would do with the testing (my daughter was diagnosed at 3 and uses a CPAP) but it could explain the night waking.

  10. My first thought was apnea. Other than that – maybe a lamp on a timer that turns on at 6:00 (or whenever you want him to get up) so that he can get a clue as to night vs day?

    Other than that, I got nothin’.

  11. He SNORES. This is atypical for a healthy child at that age. This is my first huge red flag that he has apnea, silent reflux, neck alignment or musculature issues, or something else. He also wakes multiple times crying. Flag two up!

    Does he eat a lot but still have thin upper ams and seems to burn all the excess calories easily?
    Does he sweat at night? (especially head/hair)
    Does he regularly end up sideways or reversed in bed, or otherwise seem to be a mobile sleeper (‘sleeps like a helicopter’)?
    Does he have any congestion in the morning?
    Any dental issues?

    I would go look for a physiological issue. If you answer yes on any of the above, silent reflux, apnea, adenoid problems, neck pain, or other physiological issues may be involved.

    Why? Because you just described our eldest to a T. We were glad later that we did not sleep train at this point (where I was sleeping with him on my lap in a recliner… yep!), because he was genuinely suffering. He needed the comfort we gave him, but he needed medical care more. He was never spitty as a baby, never had pain after meals that we could tell, no signs of reflux at all, except he was a restless sleeper, woke multiple times, snored, had a sweaty head, and woke like clockwork early in the morning and was DONE with sleep (blackout curtains are us).

    At 4 years old (and still waking many times a night), another lightbulb went off, when his teachers said ‘he is so calm, he sits on the benches and watches the other kids play on the playground’. Um. 4. Not playing at recess. Red Alert!

    We found out through various approaches that he had both silent reflux (scoped, meds trial) and his neck was badly misaligned. The reflux was just fumes, not regurgitating, and it caused both sinus and adenoid inflammation, which resulted in apnea. It also was dissolving his tooth enamel (15 soft spots at 2.5 years). And it was such a constant source of body-wrong-feeling (not pain per se) that he started ignoring all stomach related cues, to the point that he ceased being able to register hunger cues, which then looped him into a feeding disorder (that took other factors, though, it isn’t just from the loss of hunger cue).

    He was running on adrenaline constantly. Which makes naps hard, and waking easy. In our case, the bulk of the snoring was related to the neck issues, which when resolved also changed his play behavior at school, his ability to stay asleep more of the night, his restlessness at night.

    He is now 15. He has no trouble falling asleep, and hasn’t since he was 4. He still is a little more prone to waking at night than average, because he is over-alert to body cues at night, but that just mans he gets up to go to the bathroom and then goes back to bed. His naps came back with the right treatments (especially reflux meds), and while he is always a clockwork child (internal body clock is absolute!) he stopped being a too-early child and became just a reliable one.

    Good luck!

  12. Oh, and he was so constantly tired even post treatment, that we moved bedtime to 5:30. That worked. If we hit 6, it was too late, and we were already into adrenaline, which meant two hours of fighting to get him to sleep.

    (we did chiropractic for the neck, which also was a huge help, but not everyone is willing to do that.)

  13. Oh, and on the bed tilt – that won’t stop fumes-type reflux. You really do need to trial meds if you want to stop fumes damage.

  14. Hedra, this reflux idea is interesting. Thanks for sharing. Although our daughter is generally happy and healthy, she is very restless at night, gets sweaty and sometimes complains that her stomach hurts. She also gets coughs and is pretty skinny. Now that I write it all out, it seems a bit silly that I haven’t connected the dots. I’ve mentioned the stomach issues to the pediatrician, but she didn’t mention GERD as a possibility. I’ll try again at her upcoming appointment. We could also pay better attention to her diet.

    For the 22 month old parent, she also woke up quite a bit in the night when she was younger and even sometimes now. We just let her sleep in the bed with us, because mainly I was too tired to put her back in bed. Then she would sleep well and wake up later. I figured part of it was a co-sleeping thing where she matched our sleeping breathing patterns and rhythms. Also, if you’re all in the same room, I wonder if you or your spouse are going through some sleep cycle where you’re restless at 5:30 and he hears that and wakes up and doesn’t go back to sleep.

  15. Hedra, this reflux idea is interesting. Thanks for sharing. Although our daughter is generally happy and healthy, she is very restless at night, gets sweaty and sometimes complains that her stomach hurts. She also gets coughs and is pretty skinny. Now that I write it all out, it seems a bit silly that I haven’t connected the dots. I’ve mentioned the stomach issues to the pediatrician, but she didn’t mention GERD as a possibility. I’ll try again at her upcoming appointment. We could also pay better attention to her diet.

    For the 22 month old parent, she also woke up quite a bit in the night when she was younger and even sometimes now. We just let her sleep in the bed with us, because mainly I was too tired to put her back in bed. Then she would sleep well and wake up later. I figured part of it was a co-sleeping thing where she matched our sleeping breathing patterns and rhythms. Also, if you’re all in the same room, I wonder if you or your spouse are going through some sleep cycle where you’re restless at 5:30 and he hears that and wakes up and doesn’t go back to sleep.

  16. Snoring could also be allergies. Kids with lots of pollen/spores/molds allergies can get congested and have a terrible time sleeping; raising the bed might not do much to help that. It might be worth asking your doctor to take a look at his sinuses — ask about the snoring generally, because I agree with Hedra, that might be a useful symptom to pursue.

  17. Fascinating. Very similar to my son, minus the snoring. And my son has terrible BM’s which you didn’t mention. My son doesn’t snore but I’m currently diving down the rabbit hole of what Hedra talked about and am very overwhelmed. Usually the internet helps me, this time it’s just making me more and more overwhelmed. I’ve also never wanted to do CIO because I’ve always felt that something else was going on, just haven’t been able to put my finger on it.

  18. Agree with possibly the overtiredness. Would probably try to bring both bedtime and naptime forward by 30 – 45 mins and see if that makes a difference. Also, when I fiddled with my kids schedules it always took 3 – 5 days to see results, so if you did decide to try to push times forward (or back for that matter) I would commit to sticking it out for a week before trying something else.

  19. This is giving me a lot to think with too, thanks everybody. I too have a 22 month old who’s a terrible night sleeper, but then he always has been. Hedra, I’m wondering how you knew about the silent/fumes reflux? What kind of a test did it involve, and have you had to use medicine consistently all this time?

    My guy naps well during the day, but at night wakes up constantly. He sleeps with us, for a number of reasons: I lack the heart to CIO, especially because I’m not sure there’s not something really "off" with him; because we have lived in tiny places where CIO would be really disruptive of everybody around; because he seems to want to snuggle at night – like, he really wants to know we’re there. But he also always, always wants to nurse/drink his bottle (of milk, typically a couple of bottles), all night long. He’s 22 months, so I know that technically this is not what is recommended. We’ve never taken him in for a dental check- up – it’s on my list of things to do but we keep moving and I keep forgetting. (Plus my husband is quirkily anti-dentist (mostly having to do with mandatory x-rays, which he thinks are dangerous and a scam), and so I have to deal with that, too, each time we talk about making an appt.)

    My son has always been super duper picky – refuses 90% of all that’s offered to him, eats tiny amounts, is pretty skinny for his age (although he comes from skinny South Asian stock on one side), and would pretty much live on milk from a bottle if he could.

    Should I really truly stop giving a bottle at night? What will I do when he begs for it? Does anyone have advice (or sobering stories of why a bottle is "bad" at this point)? He isn’t the clearest talker, and somewhere I read that extended bottle feeding can negatively affect speech… does anyone know?

    I’m sorry I derailed this discussion with my own selfish mess, but I too am at a loss – I am exhausted from waking up with him so often and sleeping only on one side while he nurses/suckles all night (horrible for my alignment, for sure — could this also be the baby’s problem?!? Is he just uncomfortable/misaligned? But how do you get a suspicious 22 month old to undergo a chiro adjustment?!?). And I’m wondering if I should be worried about all the milk-drinking, in terms of his teeth, his caloric intake (is he getting all this calories from milk and that’s why he doesn’t eat?), his tongue/palate/speech, etc.

    And I just really, really, really would like to sleep better! Any thoughts, oh please?!?

  20. This is giving me a lot to think with too, thanks everybody. I too have a 22 month old who’s a terrible night sleeper, but then he always has been. Hedra, I’m wondering how you knew about the silent/fumes reflux? What kind of a test did it involve, and have you had to use medicine consistently all this time?

    My guy naps well during the day, but at night wakes up constantly. He sleeps with us, for a number of reasons: I lack the heart to CIO, especially because I’m not sure there’s not something really "off" with him; because we have lived in tiny places where CIO would be really disruptive of everybody around; because he seems to want to snuggle at night – like, he really wants to know we’re there. But he also always, always wants to nurse/drink his bottle (of milk, typically a couple of bottles), all night long. He’s 22 months, so I know that technically this is not what is recommended. We’ve never taken him in for a dental check- up – it’s on my list of things to do but we keep moving and I keep forgetting. (Plus my husband is quirkily anti-dentist (mostly having to do with mandatory x-rays, which he thinks are dangerous and a scam), and so I have to deal with that, too, each time we talk about making an appt.)

    My son has always been super duper picky – refuses 90% of all that’s offered to him, eats tiny amounts, is pretty skinny for his age (although he comes from skinny South Asian stock on one side), and would pretty much live on milk from a bottle if he could.

    Should I really truly stop giving a bottle at night? What will I do when he begs for it? Does anyone have advice (or sobering stories of why a bottle is "bad" at this point)? He isn’t the clearest talker, and somewhere I read that extended bottle feeding can negatively affect speech… does anyone know?

    I’m sorry I derailed this discussion with my own selfish mess, but I too am at a loss – I am exhausted from waking up with him so often and sleeping only on one side while he nurses/suckles all night (horrible for my alignment, for sure — could this also be the baby’s problem?!? Is he just uncomfortable/misaligned? But how do you get a suspicious 22 month old to undergo a chiro adjustment?!?). And I’m wondering if I should be worried about all the milk-drinking, in terms of his teeth, his caloric intake (is he getting all this calories from milk and that’s why he doesn’t eat?), his tongue/palate/speech, etc.

    And I just really, really, really would like to sleep better! Any thoughts, oh please?!?

  21. Hedra,
    Can you say more about the sweaty head thing? Our boy is 23 months and just started having a hard time going down at night. I’ve been wondering about reflux because he’s started burping a lot too. The sweaty head thing is him too, but it could also be September in Oklahoma. I think a lot of our guy’s recently trouble with going down at night is that he may have just realized that we stay up and he thinks he wants to play too. Best of luck to OP. I’ll be checking back for more things to look for our guy too!

    1. yes please with the sweaty head…i have a child in the pre-k class i am student teaching in who wakes up from rest time with a crazy sweaty head (none of the other kids do). we think this child is autistic. but maybe there’s other stuff going on…

  22. I personally make a distinction between whining/complaining/whimpering and full-on all-out crying. In my experience, ignoring the former eventually leads to less of it, and to a child who is better at self-soothing and sleeping on his own (AND to a better-rested everybody). I ignore whining/complaining/fussing in the middle of the night at this age, and I ignore actual crying, too, unless it goes on for more than maybe 10 minutes or so.

    Yes, overtired is totally a thing still at this age. I’d probably still be on 2 naps a day if my kids was getting up at 4:30/5 in the morning.

  23. Ooh, gosh, I totally missed that he snores. Tell your pediatrician that he snores and has diminishing sleep quality. It could be apnea and it could be tonsils or adenoids. If it’s one of those things, no amount of changing ANYTHING else is going to help.

  24. Yes, get some medical advice on the snoring ASAP.

    But if you take out the snoring part, I hear this same story over and over again. The only solution (sorry to be harsh) to get hard-ass on sleep: Extinction/CIO, the only exceptions being for significant illnesses and nightmares. The bedtime needs to be 5:30-6pm until the kid starts sleeping through the night and naps come back. I had a kid who was a short napper and an early-ish riser, so I had to be extremely diligent about nighttime sleep and bedtimes. I suppose there are some kids who can have later bedtimes (after 7pm) and sleep later and nap up a storm; my kid wasn’t one of those, and this boy sounds like he isn’t either.

    The other thing is consistency. I understand that putting your kid to bed at 6pm and putting up with some crying is unpleasant – I’ve done it. However, a sleepless LIFE (not night, LIFE) is a misery for everyone. Sure, the kid may outgrow it…in several years. Many 5,6,7 year old are still nightwaking because of the habits developed in infancy/toddlerhood. It is better to establish the rules now – bedtime is early, goodnight means goodnight, see you when the light comes on at 6am.

  25. Yes, get some medical advice on the snoring ASAP.

    But if you take out the snoring part, I hear this same story over and over again. The only solution (sorry to be harsh) to get hard-ass on sleep: Extinction/CIO, the only exceptions being for significant illnesses and nightmares. The bedtime needs to be 5:30-6pm until the kid starts sleeping through the night and naps come back. I had a kid who was a short napper and an early-ish riser, so I had to be extremely diligent about nighttime sleep and bedtimes. I suppose there are some kids who can have later bedtimes (after 7pm) and sleep later and nap up a storm; my kid wasn’t one of those, and this boy sounds like he isn’t either.

    The other thing is consistency. I understand that putting your kid to bed at 6pm and putting up with some crying is unpleasant – I’ve done it. However, a sleepless LIFE (not night, LIFE) is a misery for everyone. Sure, the kid may outgrow it…in several years. Many 5,6,7 year old are still nightwaking because of the habits developed in infancy/toddlerhood. It is better to establish the rules now – bedtime is early, goodnight means goodnight, see you when the light comes on at 6am.

  26. Wow, S. I’m really,l really wary of anyone who says "the only solution" about anything. And closing the door and refusing to acknowledge the child for 12 hours is not something many of us are prepared to do.

  27. I was just told by the GI doc doing the scope that sweaty head was one of the ‘test for reflux’ diagnostic filters he used – I don’t know why. It may be related to apnea responses, too.

    Reflux is really common in kids with ASD, too, so while it might correlate, it is not linked to ASD that I’m aware of.

  28. Have you tried co sleeping at night? Better or worse? I don’t like CIO so I wouldn’t go there. Sounds like you’re having a hard time enforcing it consistently anyway–whatever sleep training method you choose it’s really important to be consistent. I’m not and I pay for it. 😉 But seriously if you’re trying to help them build a new healthy sleep habit you can’t just occasionally let them go back to the old way.
    Some of the physical stuff other people mentioned sounds worth looking into, particularly re snoring. Once you sort that out, contact Rebecca Michi about sleep training. She’s really good about helping you make a consistent plan specific to your goals and child and then helping you stick to it. She doesn’t do CIO (though your kid will likely cry in protest some at the change). Good luck!

  29. The snoring made me immediately think of his tonsils. My son is a snorer and has large tonsils that block his airway (he’ll eventually have to have them removed). My GP and a specialist have told me that when kids have large tonsils it’s harder for them to get oxygen into their lungs which makes sleep very fitfully/restlessly. Just a theory but it might be worth getting your doctor to check it out.

  30. I agree with many of the above comments, especially about making sure that apnea is not an issue. Also, both of my kids stopped napping around 22 months, resulting in better sleep at night. Once they stopped napping, they were able to sleep through the night and wake up later. They were tired at first while their bodies were adjusting, but within a few months got used to it. Maybe he is getting ready to not need the nap? You’re not a wimp about CIO, trust your instincts about it!!!

  31. I agree with many of the above comments, especially about making sure that apnea is not an issue. Also, both of my kids stopped napping around 22 months, resulting in better sleep at night. Once they stopped napping, they were able to sleep through the night and wake up later. They were tired at first while their bodies were adjusting, but within a few months got used to it. Maybe he is getting ready to not need the nap? You’re not a wimp about CIO, trust your instincts about it!!!

  32. I have no helpful suggestions – however, I do want to share an it gets better story. After more than 5 months of my now 22 month old waking up between 4:30-5:15 am EVERY DAY this week he started sleeping until 6. I tried every suggestion here and absolutely nothing worked but it just eventually got better on its own. Hang in there…

  33. Moxie, are there posts missing, by any chance? I don’t see the "S" post that I think you were responding to (about someone who argued for "one solution" -?), and I posted something yesterday that hasn’t shown up. Just wondering if I’m missing something… thanks!!

  34. I definitely agree about getting the medical stuff checked out first, but I would like to put in my two cents in response to the question regarding 8 hours between bedtime and last nap. I was at a sleep workshop a few weeks ago, and the sleep consultant said that there should only be a four hour gap between nap and bedtime. Also, if they don’t nap, put them to bed earlier, even as early as 5:30 (bedtime should be between 5:30 and 7:30). It may seem crazy, but keeping my daughter up later to help her sleep in has never worked, but I find the more well-rested she is the better she sleeps. The sleep consultant also said that lack of sleep contributes to nightmares. Also, I don’t think there is a single person out there who has never struggled with their child’s sleep. We’re all just doing the best we can with it, so don’t be too hard on yourself.

  35. I can’t help with any of the other questions, but I can answer about the "Ok to wake" clock. We started that with my Kiddo when he was 19 months. It took about two weeks of us talking about it constantly ("When the clock turns green it’s time to wake up.") and keeping him quiet in his room when he woke up before it was time (We’d rock in his chair or let him play with toys on the floor with just his nightlight on until it was time to get up). So, it’s entirely possible that it would work for a 22 month old. All that being said, I’d make sure the snoring thing isn’t a medical issue that’s preventing him from sleeping ok.

  36. I’m going through the exact same thing with my 22 mo old too. She usually goes right back to sleep when I walk in her room and tell her it’s not time to get up yet…but it’s interrupted sleep for all if us in the house…every 2-3 hrs.

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