Q&A: toddler not eating

Andi writes:

“I’m getting a little scared for my son. He’s almost 2, and for the past two weeks almost all he’s eaten has been milk. He’ll eat breakfast in the morning. Usually waffles, a banana, and maybe some watermelon. But for the rest of the day all he wants is milk and maybe some grapes. Do you think it could be the heat wave? We live in Texas. I’m just scared he’s getting some kind of problem I’ve never heard of before.”

I love it when people answer their own questions. Most kids (unless they do have feeding issues, which you’d have noticed before age 2) go through spurts of eating nothing but certain foods or refusing things they previously loved. But I think this has a whole lot to do with the heat. If you look at the pattern, he eats in the cool of the morning, and then the rest of the day he’s just keeping his fluid levels up. Makes sense to me, but then I consumed almost nothing but iced coffee all day Monday when the weather was like Borneo here. (Apologies to any Bornean readers, but the high heat and humidity combo kills me.)

If I thought this would last forever, I’d be worried. But to me it sounds like yet another example of human beings being ultimately flexible to get our needs met. He’s covering calories, fluids, and vitamins. I’d make sure I’m also offering water. And you might see if he’ll eat at night when it’s cooler, even if it’s after his designated dinnertime. I’ll bet cash money that he goes back to eating on a more regular pattern when it gets a little cooler.

Is anyone else dealing with weather-related eating patterns in your kids? Or yourself? Or your pets? (My cats pretty much only want to eat at night when it’s hot.) What are your kids favorite hot-weather snacks? (Grapes win hands-down here.)

81 thoughts on “Q&A: toddler not eating”

  1. It might be partly the age too – I’ve noticed that my kids eat like birds (very small birds) when they’re in between growth spurts and then will all of a sudden have an appetite when it’s time to grow. My 20 month old is not in an eating phase right now. Neither is my 6 1/2 year old. Also, my 20 month-older has been famous for having “second breakfast” on a fairly regular basis. So, don’t be afraid to have breakfast at 7 and then offer something else at 8 and 9.Yogurt might be good to offer, or yogurt or fruit-smoothie based popsicles (easy to make), watery/sweet vegetables like cucumber and tomatoes might be good too. cheese sticks.

  2. It might be partly the age too – I’ve noticed that my kids eat like birds (very small birds) when they’re in between growth spurts and then will all of a sudden have an appetite when it’s time to grow. My 20 month old is not in an eating phase right now. Neither is my 6 1/2 year old. Also, my 20 month-older has been famous for having “second breakfast” on a fairly regular basis. So, don’t be afraid to have breakfast at 7 and then offer something else at 8 and 9.Yogurt might be good to offer, or yogurt or fruit-smoothie based popsicles (easy to make), watery/sweet vegetables like cucumber and tomatoes might be good too. cheese sticks.

  3. My almost 15 month old is in a low appetite phase- at least for me! I’m always hearing that these phases come and go, so I’m sure it won’t last too long. E will hardly touch anything offered for breakfast and have a pretty small dinner, but everyday his day care provider tells me he ate a great lunch! A bit frustrating, but he’s still nursing and I think that’s part of it. I’m trying “don’t offer-don’t refuse”, but maybe some more extensive weaning would get him more interested in solids. Then we’ll have to tackle night weaning, which I’m not looking forward to because we co-sleep and I imagine it will involve a lot of upset baby and tired mom/dad. Any tips on that would be great?

  4. I agree it is a combination of heat and the toddler pattern of eating in spurts. Try not to worry about it!Yogurt popsicles (aka gogurts that have been placed in the freezer) are the hands down hot weather favorite in our house. Also fresh berrries, grapes and melon. I sometimes make homemade frozen popsicles in tupperware molds using applesauce or pureed peaches and they are also a hit.
    My kittens are drinking so much water I briefly contemplated having them tested for diabetes.

  5. I agree it is a combination of heat and the toddler pattern of eating in spurts. Try not to worry about it!Yogurt popsicles (aka gogurts that have been placed in the freezer) are the hands down hot weather favorite in our house. Also fresh berrries, grapes and melon. I sometimes make homemade frozen popsicles in tupperware molds using applesauce or pureed peaches and they are also a hit.
    My kittens are drinking so much water I briefly contemplated having them tested for diabetes.

  6. I have an easier time listing all the foods my toddler WON’T eat than what he does eat. He’s favourite mantra is “don’t like it”. The problem is he complains about being hungry all the time but refuses the 5 or 10 foods I will offer to try and satiate said hunger. And then he has a hunger related meltdown.So I’ve got no answers apart from knocking your head against a brick wall occassionally. I guess it will pass. He’s just such a pleasure after he’s eaten properly and such a demon when he hasn’t, so it’s hard not to get a bit caught up in the food thing.

  7. Unless he loses significant weight honestly I would not worry about it. You could limit the milk and offer semi-solids like smoothies, cold soups, homemade yoghurt popsicles, etc. But really I’d just continue to offer a variety of healthy food and roll with it.

  8. Unless he loses significant weight honestly I would not worry about it. You could limit the milk and offer semi-solids like smoothies, cold soups, homemade yoghurt popsicles, etc. But really I’d just continue to offer a variety of healthy food and roll with it.

  9. My 2 1/2 year old has also stopped eating in the past few weeks. He eats a small breakfast, only fruit and fluids at daycare, and a small dinner. I’ve been through this before so I know that he eats in spurts and goes through phases where he hardly wants to eat anything, but I still hate it. I am SO much happier when my son eats like a horse. Isn’t that stupid? Why can’t I trust that he knows what is best for his own body???

  10. My 2 1/2 year old has also stopped eating in the past few weeks. He eats a small breakfast, only fruit and fluids at daycare, and a small dinner. I’ve been through this before so I know that he eats in spurts and goes through phases where he hardly wants to eat anything, but I still hate it. I am SO much happier when my son eats like a horse. Isn’t that stupid? Why can’t I trust that he knows what is best for his own body???

  11. @Judy B – my son gets probably 70% of his calories at daycare. I figure it’s the competition for the more limited resources there. 🙂 I’m glad, because they have good healthy food and it means I can not feel bad when I throw carrot sticks and cucumber and PB&J into a bag and we hit the park for dinner.For night weaning – well it wasn’t awful for us but it did involve some crying in the night. I did the Dr. Jay Gordon method combined with introduction of a lovey. Oh and we flipped where my son slept so he was between my HUSBAND and the wall, and my husband did the majority of the comforting, although I would reach over and pat so he would know I was not gone.
    http://www.drjaygordon.com/development/ap/sleep.asp

  12. Cold orange wedges….put them in a pitcher with some ice. Eat the orange and then let him drink the melted ice/juice. Delicious!!! Also, try making homemade posicles, you can buy the molds for less than $5 at most gorcery stores. In blender puree ripe fruit (strawberries, blueberries, peaches, etc.) and add some sugar (freezing them takes the sweetness out of fruit so you need to add some sugar).

  13. @amberjee- have you tried eating meals outside (if you’re in a climate that makes this possible right now)?My 2 year old is fairly picky. We’ve had some luck introducing new foods outside. Her menu is still more limited than I’d like, and doesn’t really include any veggies, but we are making very slow progress on expanding her food horizons.
    Pumpkin also makes breakfast her biggest meal, so we try to load her up on healthy food then. She usually eats at day care, but dinners are very hit or miss. We give her a “dessert” snack before her bath to make sure she doesn’t go to bed hungry. This snack is usually fruit, but sometimes I add more things if her dinner went untouched.
    I agree with the suggestions for smoothies. We freeze any fruit that is headed past its prime, and I pull it out and make smoothies to go with whatever we’re having for dinner at least once a week. I always keep some frozen berries on hand to make sure the resulting smoothies aren’t an odd beige color. (Pumpkin doesn’t seem to mind beige smoothies, but I do!) You can add yogurt if you’re want some protein. Pumpkin drinks lots of milk, so we usually just do fruit.
    Other than that, I’d say just keep offering new things and don’t get too stressed if your kid won’t eat them. If you’ve got a kid melting down over hunger but who won’t eat, you could try a snack bar like a Cliff Bar. They aren’t high nutrition, but they have carbs for immediate relief and protein for prolonged effect. I use them myself (I tend to melt down if I get too hungry) and my daughter likes to share them sometimes.
    @Judy B- we did nightweaning in two stages. We got down to one feeding in the middle of the night at about 10 months by slowly increasing the time between feedings. Hubby did most of the work there, and yes, there was some crying, but not as bad as I expected (except for when we tried to get rid of that last feeding- which is why it stayed). We dropped the last feeding at 23 months. I did that by just saying “no” and cuddling her and it literally took one night and involved less than a minute of crying. That was a happy surprise.

  14. I’ve noticed that my two-year-old’s appetite will be off during a mild illness, even when he seems perfectly normal otherwise, no fever, no other symptoms except perhaps slight sleepiness or more or fewer soiled diapers. Then someone else in the family will come down with whatever it was and I’ll think, oh, yeah, that must’ve been it. He’s normally a very good eater for a toddler, though, so I immediately suspect something physical when he doesn’t eat.I know the heat throws off my own appetite (probably more than my son’s, actually), so it wouldn’t be surprising if that’s it.
    We love gazpacho when it’s hot, and it is surprisingly easy to make if you have a food processor and good, fresh summer tomatoes on hand. My recipe just calls for tomatoes, bread, water, olive oil, sherry vinegar and garlic. My son LOVES gazpacho, and it is incredibly cute to hear him ask for “more ga-pat-so!”

  15. My 2 year old only eats six or so things when he’s with me: cold cereal, peanut butter, yogurt, applesauce, hummus, and occasionally corn. With nanny, he happily consumes a much greater variety (and far larger portions): watermelon, strawberries, chicken nuggets, meatballs and carrots…foods he literally will not TOUCH when mom or dad are around. It’s hard to believe my nanny is telling the truth about what he eats when he’s with her, but I do! It can be very frustrating but I just chalk it up to a control thing and try to relax about it – I know he’s getting good nutrition most weekdays and he will change his mind eventually.

  16. Great to read these comments. I’m no help except to comment that I find it useful to imagine my 2.5 year old has a bit of python in his genetic makeup … you know, eat one large rat every 3 days and then nothing until you’ve digested that. Fortunately he doesn’t actually insist it be rat.

  17. Great to read these comments. I’m no help except to comment that I find it useful to imagine my 2.5 year old has a bit of python in his genetic makeup … you know, eat one large rat every 3 days and then nothing until you’ve digested that. Fortunately he doesn’t actually insist it be rat.

  18. I would agree with the weather suggestion. I know I change how I eat based on the weather. Overall, I wouldn’t get worried unless he eats absolutely nothing for two days.

  19. I would agree with the weather suggestion. I know I change how I eat based on the weather. Overall, I wouldn’t get worried unless he eats absolutely nothing for two days.

  20. Mine is only 13 months, but she definitely goes through spurts of eat eat eat followed by refusing just about everything on her tray. RIght now we’re in a refusal stage (which she does by bashing the crap out of everything I put in front of her) I can generally get her to eat some kind of fruit, even if just a little bit. Right now she’s all about the watermelon, blueberries and raspberries. I just keep offering a variety of things and making sure she gets plenty of milk (she’s still nursing) and cool water. If she doesn’t eat all the amazing fruits in season right now, I will! 😉

  21. Mine is only 13 months, but she definitely goes through spurts of eat eat eat followed by refusing just about everything on her tray. RIght now we’re in a refusal stage (which she does by bashing the crap out of everything I put in front of her) I can generally get her to eat some kind of fruit, even if just a little bit. Right now she’s all about the watermelon, blueberries and raspberries. I just keep offering a variety of things and making sure she gets plenty of milk (she’s still nursing) and cool water. If she doesn’t eat all the amazing fruits in season right now, I will! 😉

  22. Between 2 and 5, control of food intake becomes more intentional, so you’re more likely to have these jags in general. (40% of kids this age would qualify as having a genuine feeding disorder, by the clinical criteria – so it if seems ‘weird’, then yeah, it is, and so is almost half the rest of the population at this age!)Another factor that kicks in around now – appetite goes down rapidly as the total growth requirement goes down. As much as it seems they’re growing like weeds, they’re not growing at anywhere near the rate they did in the first or second year of life. Appetite normally peaks in the early to mid-morning, and declines from about 11 AM onward to where the typical 2-5 year old has almost NO appetite by 5 PM. Think in terms of breastmilk supply if you nursed (or even if you didn’t) – their appetite actually follows the same pattern as your milk supply did – ramps up hard right before dawn, peaks mid-morning, and declines the rest of the day.
    Add in heat, which suppresses appetite, and you’ll see the pattern contract more – peak in the morning, and ‘eh’ even by 11 AM. Fluids only, or fluids with carbs (milk, juice, sorbet, popsicles) are the main interest, IME.
    My kids go on protein and fat avoidance campaigns when it is hot – kind of like anti-binging. They’ll do salt, carbs, and fluids, but not much else. We can make a nice steak or some salmon, but they’ll eat only a little before they’re done and aiming for the veggies or rice. Heck, even Miss M, who usually only drinks water or a little OJ, has been drinking rice milk by the glassful – and not eating much of her meat (and she’s usually a serious carnivore). Hot here, too.
    Best alternates for helping keep some options open for my kids (keeping in mind that the twins are almost 5, and were never picky to start with):
    hard boiled eggs (chilled)
    anything with dips or sprinkles (salad dressing, herb blends)
    squash cooked until tender (served cool or just warm)
    broccoli (cooked or raw)
    cucumber slices or sticks
    chilled or frozen blueberries
    Your main red flags for an actual full blown feeding disorder are (per the information I was given, though there may be others):
    1) Fear reaction to new foods (not just No, but panic, sobbing, fleeing)
    2) Unwillingness to try or taste most or all new foods (spitting out is totally normal, not willing to attempt is one flag)
    3) Drop in growth percentile combined with the above and not at the 1 year point (chart change after a year of age)
    4) total number of foods *including sweets/salty/fatty* is 12 or fewer (measured across 2-4 weeks, not a day or two!)
    5) Choking, gagging, vomiting, or other pretty obvious reactions to trying to eat
    Average food options across at least two weeks at this age, and 10 days is more likely if it is hot. Don’t count how much of any thing is eaten, just a nibble counts.
    And do not panic. I’ve had a kid in a feeding clinic. Even if you did have a real issue (and I don’t think you do, though I’m not a doctor), you have an amazing amount of leeway on resolving it, time-wise.
    Hang in there!

  23. Don’t forget the two year molars! My 2 year old has only had a couple decent meals in the last week or two. This is normal for her when her teeth are moving. So even though only one has come through, we know that the others are moving under the gum, and this affects how much and what she will eat.I hadn’t considered the factor that heat plays in her eating, so that’s good for me to think about too.

  24. Ditto for me with DS and the Cat. Husband, Dog and I haven’t missed a beat. Favorite hot weather treats are strawberries, hummus, yogurt and melon for DS and canned salmon for the cat.@JudyB-good luck with nightweaning. I only say, don’t start it unless you are truly committed. I swear they’re like animals-they’ll sense your hesitation. But it can be done!

  25. I second the recommendation to keep an eye out for teething signs, we’ve noticed a big change in food preferences when our 16 mo started going through the worst of it. Yesterday, she would only eat cold foods. I was shocked to see her really enjoy plain, cold, firm tofu. Frozen peas, slightly thawed. Leftover rice, still cold from the fridge. I was a little disgusted but also glad to see her relax and enjoy her little meal. She didn’t eat a lot but it seemed to be what she needed, and that’s all I have to go by… good luck to all, it’s almost September!

  26. I second the recommendation to keep an eye out for teething signs, we’ve noticed a big change in food preferences when our 16 mo started going through the worst of it. Yesterday, she would only eat cold foods. I was shocked to see her really enjoy plain, cold, firm tofu. Frozen peas, slightly thawed. Leftover rice, still cold from the fridge. I was a little disgusted but also glad to see her relax and enjoy her little meal. She didn’t eat a lot but it seemed to be what she needed, and that’s all I have to go by… good luck to all, it’s almost September!

  27. Haven’t read the other responses so forgive me but I agree with Moxie, it sounds like a normal phase and my guess is he’ll hit a growth spurt and his appetite will pick up again soon.IF you really want to try to up his calories/nutrients try some veggie/ fruit juice combos and maybe some smoothies. We do banana/avocado/mango smoothies. You can also throw a little peanut butter in there for protein. And my 19 month old will always drink carrot juice. We also do a lot of light cold food lately. So sometimes dinner will be cottage cheese and avocado. You can also offer breakfast foods at lunch/dinner time. We make veggie pancakes and scrambled eggs for lunch/dinner frequently around here.

  28. Haven’t read the other responses so forgive me but I agree with Moxie, it sounds like a normal phase and my guess is he’ll hit a growth spurt and his appetite will pick up again soon.IF you really want to try to up his calories/nutrients try some veggie/ fruit juice combos and maybe some smoothies. We do banana/avocado/mango smoothies. You can also throw a little peanut butter in there for protein. And my 19 month old will always drink carrot juice. We also do a lot of light cold food lately. So sometimes dinner will be cottage cheese and avocado. You can also offer breakfast foods at lunch/dinner time. We make veggie pancakes and scrambled eggs for lunch/dinner frequently around here.

  29. My two year old sometimes lives on milk. You all are going to disapprove, but I can get her to eat green beans, broccoli, whole wheat bread, meat, corn, etc., by eating in front of the TV. We have very little TV watching in our house, but I use it at suppertime. My husband will hit the pause button and tell her she needs to eat more … whatever. I hope I am not causing a future eating disorder.

  30. My two year old sometimes lives on milk. You all are going to disapprove, but I can get her to eat green beans, broccoli, whole wheat bread, meat, corn, etc., by eating in front of the TV. We have very little TV watching in our house, but I use it at suppertime. My husband will hit the pause button and tell her she needs to eat more … whatever. I hope I am not causing a future eating disorder.

  31. I would also bet on the heat. You could try taking him to a mall (where the AC is likely set to Antarctica), and see if he’ll eat lunch there. If he seems to like to graze, you could try putting a small tray of food on a low table and letting him nibble throughout the afternoon. My son (2 yrs) loves eating out of ice cube trays, where each cube has a different food or dip. I watch him like a hawk, of course, but he eats more than when he’s strapped into a chair.

  32. I would also bet on the heat. You could try taking him to a mall (where the AC is likely set to Antarctica), and see if he’ll eat lunch there. If he seems to like to graze, you could try putting a small tray of food on a low table and letting him nibble throughout the afternoon. My son (2 yrs) loves eating out of ice cube trays, where each cube has a different food or dip. I watch him like a hawk, of course, but he eats more than when he’s strapped into a chair.

  33. If it’s heat or molars you might also try giving him just cold food…. popscicles, frozen peas, frozen berries, etc… my guy LOVES cold food. He snacks on frozen peas while playing or watching cartoons. Weird but who am I to fight it if he wants veggies?

  34. If it’s heat or molars you might also try giving him just cold food…. popscicles, frozen peas, frozen berries, etc… my guy LOVES cold food. He snacks on frozen peas while playing or watching cartoons. Weird but who am I to fight it if he wants veggies?

  35. This sounds normal for us, too. 25 months and eating less than usual, but she is full of energy and does eat enough that I don’t worry. Especially since she is still nursing 2-3 times a day. My favorite thing to remember: it is my job to offer good food, her job to eat it. If she’s hungry, she will eat what she needs.A question: Hedra mentioned an appetite spike in the early morning, and that is so true for us. We’ve nightweaned with nursing to sleep and no nursing until morning (once she was old enough to repeat what I said, it was really easy). But, morning nursing usually takes place at about 5:30. She really seems hungry but I don’t want to wake her to push real food, so we nurse. Any tricks for pushing that back to, say, 7:00? I would love an extra hour or so of sleep!

  36. This sounds normal for us, too. 25 months and eating less than usual, but she is full of energy and does eat enough that I don’t worry. Especially since she is still nursing 2-3 times a day. My favorite thing to remember: it is my job to offer good food, her job to eat it. If she’s hungry, she will eat what she needs.A question: Hedra mentioned an appetite spike in the early morning, and that is so true for us. We’ve nightweaned with nursing to sleep and no nursing until morning (once she was old enough to repeat what I said, it was really easy). But, morning nursing usually takes place at about 5:30. She really seems hungry but I don’t want to wake her to push real food, so we nurse. Any tricks for pushing that back to, say, 7:00? I would love an extra hour or so of sleep!

  37. Well, I think I gave birth to Mr. Opposite, who is now 14 months. The kid loves veggies (broccoli is his favorite) and meat & fish – everything. But I can’t get the kid to eat fruit! What’s up with that? I’ve tried pureed, small chunks, me feed him, feed himself. Nada. He used to eat applesauce and mashed banana. But no more (at least for me. Sometimes he’ll eat applesauce at daycare). I wish he’d eat fruit as it’s a nice easy snack. Oh, and contrary to most of what I’ve read, he tends to eat more for dinner and less at breakfast.As for hot weather eating, he doesn’t seem to be affected too much. But I can’t take the humidity, so as soon as it’s hotter than 30C with the humidex, on goes the AC. But, we’re fond of salads for dinner in the summer. And fish. And gazpacho too. We do lots of BBQ (less dishes!) with side veggies or salad only, no starch. And lots of fluids. Um, and margaritas for the adults. Oh, and it’s hard not to have ice cream with fresh in-season berries for dessert.
    @Sherry- Well, you have an accomplice in the eating in front of the TV department. We rarely do it now, but we did it for a stretch recently when L was just too crazy, grabby, quick to tantrum, etc. to not make dinner time a total nightmare. And at the end of the day, when I was exhausted, it was the only way I could deal & make sure he was fed.
    I’m kind of against it in principal. Not so much for worries about eating disorders, but more from wanting to raise a son that can carry on a conversation at the dinner table, can enjoy his meal in the company of others, won’t eat more than he needs or wants (as often happens for people who eat in front of the TV) etc.
    So, after I realised I was kind of using it as a crutch (i.e. I wasn’t really exhausted some nights, it was just easier), we switched it out for kids music (one of the TV music stations – great because you always hear new stuff). Also, I figured out that if I distract him with some finger food (cheerios, cut up meat, waffle pieces etc.) right at the beginning, I can strap him in with little fuss, and then slowly start to feed him purees of veggies, etc. Usually goes pretty smoothly now.
    Essentially, slight distraction is the key. Guests for dinner works well too. Or eating anywhere but our house. Once he’s slightly distracted (but not totally engrossed) by something else, he lets down his guard enough to try new things, and to eat his dinner.

  38. Well, I think I gave birth to Mr. Opposite, who is now 14 months. The kid loves veggies (broccoli is his favorite) and meat & fish – everything. But I can’t get the kid to eat fruit! What’s up with that? I’ve tried pureed, small chunks, me feed him, feed himself. Nada. He used to eat applesauce and mashed banana. But no more (at least for me. Sometimes he’ll eat applesauce at daycare). I wish he’d eat fruit as it’s a nice easy snack. Oh, and contrary to most of what I’ve read, he tends to eat more for dinner and less at breakfast.As for hot weather eating, he doesn’t seem to be affected too much. But I can’t take the humidity, so as soon as it’s hotter than 30C with the humidex, on goes the AC. But, we’re fond of salads for dinner in the summer. And fish. And gazpacho too. We do lots of BBQ (less dishes!) with side veggies or salad only, no starch. And lots of fluids. Um, and margaritas for the adults. Oh, and it’s hard not to have ice cream with fresh in-season berries for dessert.
    @Sherry- Well, you have an accomplice in the eating in front of the TV department. We rarely do it now, but we did it for a stretch recently when L was just too crazy, grabby, quick to tantrum, etc. to not make dinner time a total nightmare. And at the end of the day, when I was exhausted, it was the only way I could deal & make sure he was fed.
    I’m kind of against it in principal. Not so much for worries about eating disorders, but more from wanting to raise a son that can carry on a conversation at the dinner table, can enjoy his meal in the company of others, won’t eat more than he needs or wants (as often happens for people who eat in front of the TV) etc.
    So, after I realised I was kind of using it as a crutch (i.e. I wasn’t really exhausted some nights, it was just easier), we switched it out for kids music (one of the TV music stations – great because you always hear new stuff). Also, I figured out that if I distract him with some finger food (cheerios, cut up meat, waffle pieces etc.) right at the beginning, I can strap him in with little fuss, and then slowly start to feed him purees of veggies, etc. Usually goes pretty smoothly now.
    Essentially, slight distraction is the key. Guests for dinner works well too. Or eating anywhere but our house. Once he’s slightly distracted (but not totally engrossed) by something else, he lets down his guard enough to try new things, and to eat his dinner.

  39. Thanks for the side discussion on night weaning. JudyB, I am so with you. I am going to check out Dr. Jay Gordon as someone recommended.

  40. @the millner- we have some luck with slight distraction, too! And change of scene. But only sometimes. I have actually given up trying to predict what she’ll try and when. This is how we got grapes, her current favorite fruit, onto her list of OK foods: We had some friends over and were all eating grapes, cheese, and crackers outside. Pumpkin suddenly wanted grapes and would whine if we didn’t give them to her.We’ve tried repeating this process with other foods, and had no luck.
    @Sherry- we let Pumpkin watch TV (or Elmo on the computer) during meals and snacks sometimes. We tell her it is a special treat. Sometimes it makes her eat better. Sometimes she is so engrossed with the TV that she won’t eat at all. I’d say that as long as you aren’t making it a high pressure thing, and as long as she’ll eat sometimes without the TV reward, you’re probably fine. (But what do I know? I don’t think anyone would look at my daughter and say: “gee, I want my kid to eat like THAT”.)
    Really, my number one piece of advice on all food things is not to stress. I’ve tried stressing and not stressing. She eats the same either way. I’m much happier if I don’t stress.
    One more thing on nightweaning- don’t freak out if the first approach you try doesn’t work. We tried the standard nurse a few minutes less each night/slowly decrease the amount in the bottle (Hubby was doing one feeding per night at that point). This failed spectacularly for us- much screaming, not much sleep. I searched Moxie in desperation and found a post from someone who had tried instead to delay the night feedings- 15 minutes later each night. This method worked great for us. Pumpkin would fuss/cry/scream for a few minutes, but Hubby would bounce her, and rock her, and put music on and she’d go back to sleep (in his arms) for awhile. My memory is fuzzy on the details, but I posted on all of this at the time- sleep at that point was pretty much an all-consuming obsession for me. You could search my blog on “nightweaning”.
    I’ve posted a lot on the food thing, too. It was another all-consuming obsession at one point.

  41. One of my 2.5 year olds is also eating very little, and I think it’s mostly molars and distraction. It’s upsetting, since he’s skinny (like me), but I try to just go with the flow, keep offering. I am somewhat comforted by the fact that a few times a week he absolutely pigs out on a favorite like pesto pasta.@ Judy B and night-weaning. This has been another area where having twins has been really illuminating. At about 15 months I started following Jay Gordon’s method with one boy, who seemed more likely to go for it, after first explaining to him what was going on. It worked really well, in that I was no longer nursing at night after just a week, and there was little crying. Unfortunately it didn’t magically lead to better sleeping, rather the nursing was replaced by lengthy back patting. Boy B was a different story, just cried for boob boob boob when i tried, it was heartbreaking and I couldn’t deal with it. He was also spending most of the night in bed with us. So I just kept nursing him at night. I had massive guilt because boy A was asleep in his crib in another room while B was at the boob all night next to me. Ugh. When they were 18 months I had to go away for work for 5 nights. They stayed with my husband and his mother. Apparently there was minimal crying. I pumped, and when I got back we resumed nursing, but not at night. From then on we were morning and bedtime only for both of them. I certainly don’t recommend ‘weaning by desertion’ but in our case I’m sure the alternative would have been unpleasant for all of us. I think our nursing relationship was at its best between 18 months, when they were both night-weaned and 23 months when they were both completely weaned.

  42. I have one kid who eats like The Nothing from The Neverending Story, and one kid who has eating problems that require intervention.Hedra’s checklist is good, BUT! Not all children with eating problems lose weight. Millbarge is a freaking butterball. Every time we take her anywhere for feeding evaluation, they try to evaluate Fitz-Hume, instead. This? THIS child? This big ROUND child? She has eating problems? Surely you mean her twig-like sibling? Then they test/observe her and oh, hey, that’s pretty messed up, there, isn’t it?
    I really like Ellyn Satter’s books and general approach, which is that you just keep offering a variety of foods without judgment or pressure, and eventually they’ll eat (or won’t).
    Of course, this doesn’t apply to kids with actual feeding problems. Millbarge would quite cheerfully starve to death if pressured.
    Oh, that’s the other thing: Millbarge is a better eater when I load up her tray and then observe from a distance, rather than sit next to or in front of her. She gets this weird performance anxiety with regards to new foods, and prefers to try them when she thinks nobody is looking. She’s a little weird, I know.

  43. Oh, man. I just read Hedra’s list, and having spent over a year telling myself not to write in to Moxie because I’m probably just neurotic, now I’m wondering if maybe my kid does have an actual issue. Basically, her default attitude toward food is suspicion. She LOVES to nurse, always has, and seems to regard other forms of sustenance as poor substitutes for the boob. Most days/weeks she covers most food groups, so I try not to obsess and when necessary I huddle in the corner of the kitchen reading Ellyn Satter to myself, but here’s the problem: she actually consumes no calcium at all, aside from nursing. She won’t taste milk or soy milk or even calcium enriched juice, and she won’t eat yogurt or cheese or even ice cream. She drinks water and eats fruit, some veggies, bread, cereal, beans, nuts, and the occasional bite of meat. She’s like a two-year-old yogi. Thanks to the avid nursing, her skeleton is intact, but I hate feeling like I can’t wean her because her bones would crumble if I did. Is there any hope that if she did wean she’d become more open to drinking milk? I mean, seriously, the child refuses to taste ice cream. Her doctor gave us permission to try chocolate milk: no go. I truly don’t think it’s an allergy issue, either — no family history, no issue with my drinking milk while nursing, no bad reactions on the occasions she does taste some cheese (on pizza or occasionally in grilled cheese). We just can’t even get her to try anything that isn’t water. Anyone out there who’s dealt with this?P.S. Oh, yeah: she doesn’t eat anything she can’t pick up in her hands or spear with a fork. No soft foods at all. Oh my heavens.

  44. @Cathy- you don’t say how old your daughter is. I pumped at work until mine was almost 18 months old because she had such a limited diet of “real” foods. Your daughter’s diet sounds better than Pumpkin’s was at about 12-14 months. She pretty much only wanted graham crackers and Annie’s Peace Pasta. She wouldn’t eat cheese. She preferred her fruits pureed and fed to her- no finger fruits.And she was prone to throwing sippy cups with anything but water in them across the room.
    It was a stressful time, because I had to get her off bottles and onto sippy cups and into finger foods before she could move up to the 1 year old room at day care, which she clearly needed to do.
    Now she’s 2 and a bit, and while not a great eater, she does OK. She will never try something new on the first (or even 5th) presentation, though. She has to warm up to it slowly. This sort of behavior isn’t abnormal, by the way- it is a perfectly reasonable response if you think about the fact that for most of human history, just trying something new could kill you. There was a certain selective advantage to being cautious.
    Pumpkin started drinking cow’s milk fine once I found a sippy cup that she liked. Now she’ll drink it from any sort of cup. I weaned her at 23 months, and she’s doing fine.
    Her doctor has never been worried. She is a skinny kid, but my husband is a skinny guy. Her growth curve is normal (i.e., no dropping percentiles) and she’s making all of her developmental milestones.
    I think I have been able to calm down about the food thing because I am a picky eater, too. So once I thought about it from the standpoint of my memories of childhood, I was a lot less freaked out. I wrote a post on this a while back that some people have told me helped them. So I’ll link to it here:
    http://wandsci.blogspot.com/2008/11/confessions-of-picky-eater.html
    Email me at wandsci at gmail dot com if you want to chat more about this.

  45. @Cathy — My 2 1/2 year old son doesn’t drink milk, never did. He also loved to nurse. Occasionally he eats yogurt, occasionally mac’n’cheese, but otherwise no dairy: hates milk & cheese. I tried everything — chocolate, strawberry, cow, goat, soy, rice etc etc. I tried to get him to eat ice cream (the quality kind, where a serving is 15% of daily calcium needs) and for a long time he wasn’t interested, now he loves it but, please, I don’t want him eating several servings of ice cream a day! So, I went to GNC and got a calcium supplement for children, with no artificial flavours/colours, and give him one in the morning and one in the evening and I never even think about milk anymore. Many of the world’s children do not consume milk and in some parts of Asia where milk is not routinely consumed they do not have higher rates of osteo. So, all this to say, don’t worry too much. You are not alone and your child will survive just fine :))

  46. What Cloud says rings true for me like nothing else: “Really, my number one piece of advice on all food things is not to stress. I’ve tried stressing and not stressing. She eats the same either way. I’m much happier if I don’t stress.” So, we can drive ourselves crazy or let go completely, either way the kid will eat what s/he will eat. Let’s, in that case, let go.

  47. My 3-year-old son still nurses avidly: I’d love to wean him, but his diet is so limited that I think he’d get scurvy as soon as I did. But it’s a bit of a vicious circle because he refuses to eat food on the basis that he knows he can get boob later, if he whines enough, and then he gets so miserable that it’s really all he will take, so I give in… If actual food was all that was on offer he’d live on crackers, bagels, juice, and milk, and maybe expand his horizons a little beyond that. As it is, he doesn’t have to because he can always take it out on me later (so to speak). But he doesn’t eat any meat, fish, eggs, cheese, fruit or vegetables. His only protein sources are nuts, peanut butter, and milk/yogurt, and I’m really not sure where he’s getting any iron from. His doctor isn’t worried, just says to give him a vitamin and work on the veggies, but I’m not sure she knows how much we’re still nursing… Sigh.

  48. @the milliner, fruit isn’t as essential as you’d think if they’re eating veggies. And if he’s at all sensitive to fructose, fruit will tend to make him feel bad (even with no GI symptoms, the drop in tryptophan and serotonin are Not Fun for those who suffer from it). Trust him. You can introduce fruits later (after 5 years or so) when a) fructose absorption is higher anyway, and b) they are less forceful about their control of food.My eldest only eats grapes and the occasional apple slices for fruit. His diet just FEELS weird to me, but it is actually quite solid when I run it through the my pyramid tracker on the FDA website. Most of the nutrients you’d find in fruit you will also find in veggies. Let him carry on (especially if he’s avoiding apples, pears, pit fruits, melon, and mango, I’d bet he can’t tolerate the fructose load from those – try clementine oranges, kiwi, and blueberries instead – especially frozen, the latter two can be kind of fun, and if he IS malabsorpbing fructose even a bit, those ones are pretty safe so should give him a positive association with fruit flavor -> feel okay).
    My doctor also said that breastmilk is a very healthy and nutritious part of a toddler diet, and if we wanted to reduce worry about dietary value, keep nursing. They may go on food jags, but a nursing jag is still mighty nutritious, all in all. It’s just not enough for the long haul at that age.
    @cloud, one of the reasons why picky eating from 2-5 years old is considered normal is that ‘poison rejection’ response – and 70% of that is genetic, too. Kids that age are less likely to be right under their parent’s nose, and still have no judgment. So the resistance to eating it, very very sane. One of the strategies we had to do with Mr G was to just get him acclimated to foods – on the table, on his plate, he didn’t have to touch them, try them, or eat them, just had to be near them enough to feel comfortable that they were indeed food.
    And then usually he didn’t like them even if he did eventually try them… but that wasn’t the point. The point was willing to try things that register as food (family meal culture is important – having everyone eat mostly the same things helps set that mental picture of ‘what is food’ for the kids).
    @Cathy, your daughter may be a calcium taster. Calcium even to most folks is pretty strong and is not necessarily nice tasting. People with the extra gene for being able to taste it, it is FOUL FOUL NASTY AWFUL STUFF. So, she may avoid because, well, duh, it tastes gross. (There was an article on that somewhere in the last 6 months, but I can’t recall where…)
    Miss M was the same way. Broccoli was the only source of calcium other than nursing for a long time. She has very gradually (after 3 1/2 or so) acclimated to calcium enriched oj, and a smidge of rice milk, and FINALLY, in the last 4 or so months, she’s taken to ONE brand of soy yogurt (the only one that’s safe for her from the fructose angle – no inulin/FOS/prebiotics). But mainly, it’s greens, which are not that good a source, really. I’ve tried every supplement available, liquids, chewables, dissolving tablets for the elderly, unsweetened, sweetened, you name it, it has FAILED. She says they taste bad. So… maybe she tastes it, too. The doc said to just keep trying as we go, and aim for getting a reasonable amount in daily by the time she’s 6 or 7 years old, at least… might make that. Barely. And that’s still on the late side, but it is based on knowing HER. So long as she’s growing well, we try not to fret (lots of practice on not fretting when I’d rather fret until my hair falls out!).
    The sour gummy calcium bears were the only supplement that was tolerated for taste, but they are gummies, and they probably contributed to her ending up with two root canals… so, I can’t recommend them unless you brush AND floss right after, every blessed time. Hang in there! The suspicion of food is a flag, but until you have a few flags together, you don’t have an ‘issue’ – you just have a watchful eye. Which you’re doing. (And keep in mind, that set of flags is also true for that 40% that is Normal but still 100% inside the diagnostic criteria for feeding disorders).
    You can email me if you like… halexisp at dca dot net …

  49. hedra, have your fructose malabsorbers been able to tolerate more fructose as they’ve gotten older? are you expecting / hoping for them to?(sorry for the hijack – i have nothing to add since my toddler eats the legs off tables & always has. i really really try to not be smug about it, though. hell, after 7 1/2 months in nicu, 13 months with an ostomy, and 17 months on oxygen, i deserve *something* easy… 😀 )

  50. I read this with sympathy…my 2 year old eats probably 8 thinks. Sometimes. It’s a crapshoot whether he’ll eat something he LOVED yesterday today.It’s so tough. I know he’s teething and I know he’s excersizing control, but as a member of the “you MUST clean your plate club” in my childhood, this makes me stress SO MUCH. It’s completely irrational how much food issues make me crazy.
    And for the record, he’s HUGE. off the charts huge. People mention it all the time, saying things like, “oh, you must be feeding THAT one well” (he’s my 4th kid) and I roll my eyes and giggle inside.
    Cloud’s wisdom is going to be my new mantra. “Really, my number one piece of advice on all food things is not to stress. I’ve tried stressing and not stressing. She eats the same either way. I’m much happier if I don’t stress.” repeat. breath. repeat again…

  51. I read this with sympathy…my 2 year old eats probably 8 thinks. Sometimes. It’s a crapshoot whether he’ll eat something he LOVED yesterday today.It’s so tough. I know he’s teething and I know he’s excersizing control, but as a member of the “you MUST clean your plate club” in my childhood, this makes me stress SO MUCH. It’s completely irrational how much food issues make me crazy.
    And for the record, he’s HUGE. off the charts huge. People mention it all the time, saying things like, “oh, you must be feeding THAT one well” (he’s my 4th kid) and I roll my eyes and giggle inside.
    Cloud’s wisdom is going to be my new mantra. “Really, my number one piece of advice on all food things is not to stress. I’ve tried stressing and not stressing. She eats the same either way. I’m much happier if I don’t stress.” repeat. breath. repeat again…

  52. @hedra- I can’t imagine what it would be like to taste calcium and to not like it. I love dairy products! Increased ice cream intake is pretty much the only thing I like about being pregnant.However, I’m pretty sure that I am in the group of people who taste the bitter in vegetables particularly well. It is particularly difficult during pregnancy- veggies taste extra bitter. And I’m trying to choke them down to set a good example for Pumpkin and to expose baby #2 to the taste…. Ugh.
    If it makes any of you with picky toddlers feel any better, my Mom tells me I ate worse than Pumpkin when I was her age. I now manage a fairly balanced diet. I improved slowly over the years at home, but my diet got much better when I went off to college. (@akeeyu- just like your child, I am more likely to try something new when no one is watching…)

  53. I”m pregnant with number 2 and E (2 years) and I habitually have “second breakfast”. If it’s super hot she doesn’t have much for lunch, but I don’t worry ’cause she’s eaten twice already.

  54. I am a true believe in the sentiment of “they eat the same whether or not you stress out about it, so don’t stress out about it.”With my first son, I stressed. OH HOW I STRESSED. He ate very little as a toddler, though he ate a wide variety of foods, and would go through periods of non-eating. I was just beside myself. Interestingly, he’s a great eater now (he’s six), and very tall though quite thin.
    I couldn’t put myself through that misery again with my second son, who also went through periods of complete non-eating. But the difference was that I just Let. It. Go. If he ate, he ate. If he didn’t, he didn’t. And he was just fine. He’s two now, and sometimes he eats, sometimes he doesn’t (the non-eating often coincides with travel and other big changes to his routine). And I really just don’t care — I just keep offering the food.
    Both boys are thriving shamelessly, by the way. Tall and strong. I have a third son now, four months old. I plan on not stressing over his eating habits, either. It’s so much easier that way! 🙂

  55. My 2.5 year old is not a picky eater at all, but after coming back to southern Japan (which is the apex of hot and humid) in the middle of this summer without getting used to the heat gradually, all my son wants to eat are popsicles. Okay, me too. So we are just doing baby food for him! I’m pureeing his faves and freezing them in popsicles and in cubes. He quite likes them that way. Cold pasta salad is a biggy too.

  56. My kids had trouble with the homemade popsicles, especially since they seem to freeze more solid than storebought ones. So, I freeze stuff in ice cube trays and then puree it in food processor. It comes out the consistency of Italian ice, and they suck it down. I’ve done it with juice (lemonade is my favorite), but I’ve also done it with yogurt-based concoctions.

  57. re: the side conversation on night weaning – I just wanted to say that everyone has wildly different experience with this! For my DS (nightweaned at 8 1/2 months to get him to sleep through the night), it was a breeze. He didn’t even notice after one or two nights (DH soothing). Turns out what he really wanted was sleep! Just wanted to add that because we hear a lot of “difficult” stories; sometimes little ones resist, but sometimes they don’t.

  58. @ those whose kids won’t drink milk, I just wanted to say to keep trying. My son weaned at 13 months and would not drink milk in any form (cow’s or frozen breast milk) for 6 months. Then one day I noticed that he liked drinking the milk out of his cereal bowl, I tried it in a sippy cup again, and now he LOVES milk. I was really stressed over it at the time, but I’m glad I didn’t push it!Another dairy idea is pudding. We buy the Cozy Shack rice and chocolate puddings. They are made with real sugar, not HFCS, and the calorie content is not much more than yogurt. My son loves them.
    I enjoyed reading this post and the comments and now feel that my son’s behavior is totally normal. He is also not interested in dinner most nights, will only eat bananas and occasionally applesauce when it comes to fruit, but loves broccoli and carrots, especially in soup. We once went on a week vacation where he ate noting but cheerios and bread. I was so stressed at the time, but I’m learning not to let it get to me. Reading others’ comments helps.

  59. @marci, slighly better after 3 years, but not a lot. And really, they’re not going to get much better at this point, period (1-3 years is supposed to be the lowest capacity, other than in very old age). The youngests are almost 5, now. We’re pretty much stuck with what we’ve got.However, there’s potential hope in the future – a German company has patented an enzyme that could be taken with food… but it will be likely 10 years before that’s available to the public. Maybe longer (so much testing to be done!). Still… the idea that they could chew a pill like for lactose… oh, such a nice thought. Even if they’re teens before it hits. Now, pray that it works, and it isn’t a total bust.
    Still, they’re doing okay. They actually eat pretty well, compared to a lot of kids. And it is kind of entertaining some days to have the only kid at the party begging for more veggies… (though I do get some odd looks when I say things like, ‘I brought you some cake, and NO you cannot have any more broccoli, that’s ENOUGH for today. No, no more carrots, either, and don’t even ask about the canteloupe. Have your cake.’) Now, if only I could actually let them binge as much on veggies as they’d like… sigh. Let alone fruit. Bleah.
    Stupid genes. (My great grandmother is to blame. She’s the farthest back known source of the genotype for the dual lactose/fructose issue in my family. Fortunately, one of the girls didn’t get the early-onset lactose intolerance along with the fructose malabsorption. Great-grandma grew up on a dairy farm, and couldn’t eat dairy or fruit, and few veggies. Mainly lived on potatoes and meat.)

  60. You know, I wonder how much of this behavior is an evolutionary adaptation.If you don’t have a refrigerator or a local market, you eat what is available (either dead or in season) for as long as you have access to it.
    My girls have practically eaten their weights in blueberries in the last month because they’re crazy cheap right now. Before that it was dollar-a-pound nectarines. When the blueberries dry up, it’ll be whatever else is cheap in the produce aisle for as long as I can get it.
    I wonder if what we label as ‘weird’ in toddlers is just the remnants of survival behaviors.

  61. I’m not clear on whether the mom who wrote in is talking about her son only wanting breastmilk or cow’s milk after breakfast. Isn’t cow’s milk one of those things that parents are supposed to limit (giving water after a certain amount) because they can fill up little tummies and keep them from getting hungry? We don’t really drink milk, so I haven’t paid attention to “the rules” on that, but I remember reading that somewhere.

  62. @irisI know I asked that question ‘Any tricks for pushing (the first nurse of the day) back to, say, 7:00? I would love an extra hour or so of sleep!’ a number of times here and never got a reply. In fact I suspected there were a lot of readers out their quietly sniggering to themselves. I’m not sniggering BTW.
    Answer: NO. Not until I totally cut out the morning BF session. And that was around 28 months. And then it took a couple of weeks before DD realised there was no booby to be had at all until the afternoon. Only then did she sleep a little longer (I got an extra hour, maybe 1.5, most days).
    @Judy B
    My daughter was nursing around 5 times a day when her appetite was at its lowest ( 17 months). I was also toying with the idea of cutting back on nursing sessions ‘cos she was one of those kids that ate around 8 different things and everything had to be blended, even pasta. She was on the 3rd percentile for weight too, which added to my worry. The ped had menitoned that at the next check up if things hadn’t changed we could consider taking away a couple of nurses ( my ped is very pro extended nursing thankfully)but there was no need cos at 17.5 month, wham, she started eating everything that was on offer. And there was no turning back either, cos now at 31 months, she is a more varied eater than her 4.5 year old. brother. I honestly don’t think cutting back on her BF sessions would have made any difference, in fact, it would have only taken away precious calories/nutrients.
    Oh, her interest in food coincided with a trip to Australia to see my family. There were 10 of us round the dinner table every night and loads of interesting dishes. Her elder cousins were hoeing into pasta dishes, stinky cheese and pork dishes, brightly coloured vegetables. I mean, if you see others doing something that looks like fun, why would you want to miss out?

  63. paola, did her growth chart percentile change once her eating picked up, or is she still a petite one, just a petite one who eats like a trucker?

  64. @marci’Just a petite one who eats like a trucker’- LOL. That’s my girl! She has gone up to around 7% in weight, but has jumped to 50-75% for height (she had been 25-50% previously). This was at her 2 year check. If she can maintain this into her adult life, she’ll be pretty happy I suspect.

  65. At 23 months he’s a pretty good eater if I use the term “good” really loosely. Just the usual finicky/abrupt changes in likes and dislikes. He got a taste of orange juice a few weeks ago and decided that’s all he wanted to drink ever. Normally it’s milk or water and he was a great milk (soy or regular, he doesn’t care) drinker. It’s been a real pain weaning him off the OJ. Just had to keep telling him we didn’t have any and eventually he started drinking milk again.

  66. @Paola, I had to laugh at your comment. I had an epiphany moment at one point, when I realized that Pumpkin’s 50% height, 15% weight would probably make her pretty happy if it persisted into adulthood! It was also at about this time that I looked at Hubby and his sister and thought, well DUH! They are average height and slender, just like Pumpkin.

  67. frozen fruit/veg does a better job of helping you cool off than popsicles, ice cream, ice water etc. because it stays colder longer in your stomach. or so it seems to me. maybe it’s all in my head, but i don’t care, because it’s helping me withstand this northeast heat.

  68. I’d like to mention the very fabulous book about eating “Child of Mine” by Ellyn Satter. Every parent I know who has taken this book to heart has had about a 5000% reduction in their stress level about children’s eating. I actually think that Her other book, “How to Get You Kid to Eat … but Too Much,” is even better. Seriously, it is better than valium.

  69. I was just talking about this last night with my friends – one friend’s kids are milk fiends and did the same thing. The pediatrician told them to limit the milk because too much milk and not enough food puts them at risk for iron deficiency anemia. They told the kids (aged 18 mos and 4) they could only have milk after they had eaten something, otherwise they got water to drink.

  70. @Cathy – Many fishes (sardine, salmon, trout) and dark greens (collard, spinach, kale, broccoli) and fortified cereals (eaten dry) contain plenty of calcium. No need to worry about the refusal to consume dairy!

  71. Re: night weaning, we tried 3 times without success when my daughter was sleeping in her own cot, only to succeed (where success = no feeds between 7-8pmish and 5am) at 18 months when her sleep had become so atrocious that we had started cosleeping again! I put a pillow between the Milk Bar and my daughter (excellent advice from my SIL), told her no when she woke, and that demolished the 10pm feed in one night and with under 5 minutes of protest. The 4-5am feed was harder to tackle, and she still tries to angle for a feed before 5am sometimes, but as she’s cosleeping we can cuddle her and pat her etc quite easily. She’s a sucker for a back rub. I wouldn’t have thought sleeping next to the Milk Bar without feeding would ever be possible, but apparently toddlers are just weird enough to make it work sometimes.Also, my daughter started eating rather more when she was nightweaned (and I personally like the 5am feed, as it means she will eat breakfast at a reasonable hour – not so if we push it back to 6 or 7 when she won’t be hungry until 9ish) but is still doesn’t eat much, but she’s 75th percentile for weight and 95th for height so obviously not starving.
    Mantra from mothercraft school hereabouts: you decide what to offer and when; they decide whether to eat and how much; the most important thing is their relationship with food, not their calorie intake on any given day. Easier said than done but worth trying to remember on the days when the only intake is CHEESE.

  72. We celebrated the big event with a Great Big Birthday Party on Sunday. Nearly fifty people joined us in the backyard, including all four of Milo’s beloved grandparents and lots of wonderful friends.

  73. I feel like chiming in on one of my favorite subjects: I’ve always been a huge Ridge fan. The 81, 82, 83, 84 string of vintages from Ridge helped me to cut my teeth on Zinasdffandels. Had the last 81 just about 8 or 9 years ago, and it was hanging on.That said, I’ve had 10 disappointing older Zins for every 1 that made it to maturity (however you define ‘maturity’.)

  74. trading the novelty of songs like “Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa” and “Oxford Comma” for sheer emotional impact. 80% of the song is textbook pop, with Ezra Koenig pleading with a lover, “If you leave I just don’t think I could take it,” as a violin flutters in response. Then, at the ¾ mark, the band slows down to an ambient crawl, and the 22-year-old Koenig metes out a couple couplets that shed light on the rest of the song: “When you left to go to the kitchen/ I imagined that you were dead/ A morbid streak runs through the whole of my family/ But for you I could put it to rest.”

  75. Times and Roku is what thye ARE NOT doing by keeping old business models while inventing new ones. Sort of one hand not knowing what the other is doing. Roku rolls out new platforms but hasn’t tackled the key question of selling more boxes. You need one for each TV. Why not discount multiple orders for people with more than one TV? Financial Times wants to make online access free or pay depending upon the frequency of use, but it continues to charge customers TWO fees if the customer subscribes to print AND wants an subscription online as well. Do the people in office A ever talk to the people in office B

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