The future of the world

I’m in an auditorium right now waiting for 10 middle schoolers to face off against each other playing math video games. Their classes have come to cheer them on, and the place is pandemonium. For math, people.As long as the swine flu doesn’t get us, I think we’ll be OK.
Q&A up this afternoon.

0 thoughts on “The future of the world”

  1. back in the dark ages when video games were just two pieces of paper and a rock, i was a mathlete. and no one ever cheered me on. i am so happy to hear about this turn of events.

  2. back in the dark ages when video games were just two pieces of paper and a rock, i was a mathlete. and no one ever cheered me on. i am so happy to hear about this turn of events.

  3. Having children TOTALLY restored my faith in the world. Like Sandburg said, “A baby is God’s opinion that the world should go on.” I used that quote on my baby boy’s birth announcement because I believe it so strongly. Check OUT those middle schoolers psyched by math, Mox! What an adventure we have before us, watching amazing kids like ours become the future!!!

  4. Having children TOTALLY restored my faith in the world. Like Sandburg said, “A baby is God’s opinion that the world should go on.” I used that quote on my baby boy’s birth announcement because I believe it so strongly. Check OUT those middle schoolers psyched by math, Mox! What an adventure we have before us, watching amazing kids like ours become the future!!!

  5. A pleasure for me to say hello. My name is Evan, the only thing I want is to congratulate the creators of this blog, first for having taken the time and desire necessary, and second because she left me fascinated by this reading, a long time I had the opportunity to read such interesting articles. Thank you very much for allowing me to tell.

  6. A pleasure for me to say hello. My name is Evan, the only thing I want is to congratulate the creators of this blog, first for having taken the time and desire necessary, and second because she left me fascinated by this reading, a long time I had the opportunity to read such interesting articles. Thank you very much for allowing me to tell.

  7. I loved it! I am sure that many other readers also will like this article, was exactly what I was looking for long blogs are my way of solving problems. I appreciate the opportunity to read it.

  8. I loved it! I am sure that many other readers also will like this article, was exactly what I was looking for long blogs are my way of solving problems. I appreciate the opportunity to read it.

  9. , I think it’s important that you are your own adoatvce. It seems like you are waiting for someone to come and fight this fight for you. Nurse where you want to nurse. If you want to nurse in the sanctuary with a cover (or even without), do it. If you want to sit in the back row next to the wall, do it. If you want to nurse in the nursery, do it. If a volunteer in the nursery tells you that you cannot do it, talk to the head of the children’s education and ask what the policy on adults in and out of the nursery is. If there isn’t one, suggest one and help them get started. If the policy is that once service has started they don’t allow adults in and out of the nursery, let your church know you need an alternative nursing area. Don’t ask them if they’ll do it, let them know it’s a need in the congregation.While I do know a few people who are so modest (not sure that’s really an accurate word for it) that they can’t even be in the same room as a woman who is nursing while completely covered, I think that is their issue and not yours. The laws that allow a woman to nurse do not stop at the door of a church even if the church’s definition of sexuality, modesty, or anything else differ from culture. If you want to nurse your baby somewhere, get yourself comfortable and do it. Melody- To address your questions on how this all works, I thought I’d add my two cents. It sounds like the poster goes to both a smaller church and a more conservative church. This is likely difficult for her for a few reasons. One, in a smaller church it’s less likely that there will be someone else who shares the same parenting philosophy as Glenda does. It’s definitely in the minority in most regions of the country and hard enough to find someone who is like-minded in a town of 5,000. Imagine the chances of finding someone in a church congregation of 75-100 people. Second, in certain churches modesty and covering one’s body is a *big deal*. Should knees show under skirts? Should women be wearing sleeveless shirts? What about collar bones? Aren’t they one of the most evocative parts of a woman’s body? After hearing this for years in church, home, and Sunday school many women worry (sometimes to a fault) that certain clothes they wear or things they do, like breastfeeding, may be interpreted as immodest. Also, they assume that because they want such a high level of privacy others want it too. It sounds like the women who closed the door while Glenda was feeding thought they were helping her out.In many churches there is no guideline or rule dealing with nursing. Many medium and larger sized churches offer nursing rooms off the sanctuary where moms can take nursing babies and small children during the service. I know many moms feel as though they are expected to use these rooms instead of invited to use them. I have used them in the past when my first son was using a nipple shield and it took quite the contortion to get him nursing. I also used it for a while with my second when it took him a good 7-10 minutes of off/on to get him latched and nursing at each feeding. Some moms like them because their babies are distracted in church or are loud nursers. Great. Some moms find even these rooms hard to use because there are other mothers and babies in there and it makes them uncomfortable. While I don’t necessarily feel that way myself I can understand how a mom might feel that way. No matter the reason a mom chooses to nurse in the sanctuary, the nursing room, the nursery or wherever, I think that is her choice and it is okay. If a mom feels uncomfortable nursing in any of the following places or lacks a place in her church where she does feel comfortable, I think it is her job to persue finding a comfortable place. Talk with the head of the children’s education or childcare committee. Talk to the deacons and elders. Talk with your pastor and your pastor’s wife. No matter what churches are for the people who attend them. Nursing is not on the list of activities that are non-compatible with spirituality or church. If a church isn’t meeting that need, ask around. How are other churches in your area dealing with this issue? Is the issue space? Misplaced modesty? Mother’s desire to have a more private area? Whatever it is, if you are making a long term commitment to nursing and to that particular church it’s well worth it to figure out who can help you find a solution to that situation.[]

  10. , I think it’s important that you are your own adoatvce. It seems like you are waiting for someone to come and fight this fight for you. Nurse where you want to nurse. If you want to nurse in the sanctuary with a cover (or even without), do it. If you want to sit in the back row next to the wall, do it. If you want to nurse in the nursery, do it. If a volunteer in the nursery tells you that you cannot do it, talk to the head of the children’s education and ask what the policy on adults in and out of the nursery is. If there isn’t one, suggest one and help them get started. If the policy is that once service has started they don’t allow adults in and out of the nursery, let your church know you need an alternative nursing area. Don’t ask them if they’ll do it, let them know it’s a need in the congregation.While I do know a few people who are so modest (not sure that’s really an accurate word for it) that they can’t even be in the same room as a woman who is nursing while completely covered, I think that is their issue and not yours. The laws that allow a woman to nurse do not stop at the door of a church even if the church’s definition of sexuality, modesty, or anything else differ from culture. If you want to nurse your baby somewhere, get yourself comfortable and do it. Melody- To address your questions on how this all works, I thought I’d add my two cents. It sounds like the poster goes to both a smaller church and a more conservative church. This is likely difficult for her for a few reasons. One, in a smaller church it’s less likely that there will be someone else who shares the same parenting philosophy as Glenda does. It’s definitely in the minority in most regions of the country and hard enough to find someone who is like-minded in a town of 5,000. Imagine the chances of finding someone in a church congregation of 75-100 people. Second, in certain churches modesty and covering one’s body is a *big deal*. Should knees show under skirts? Should women be wearing sleeveless shirts? What about collar bones? Aren’t they one of the most evocative parts of a woman’s body? After hearing this for years in church, home, and Sunday school many women worry (sometimes to a fault) that certain clothes they wear or things they do, like breastfeeding, may be interpreted as immodest. Also, they assume that because they want such a high level of privacy others want it too. It sounds like the women who closed the door while Glenda was feeding thought they were helping her out.In many churches there is no guideline or rule dealing with nursing. Many medium and larger sized churches offer nursing rooms off the sanctuary where moms can take nursing babies and small children during the service. I know many moms feel as though they are expected to use these rooms instead of invited to use them. I have used them in the past when my first son was using a nipple shield and it took quite the contortion to get him nursing. I also used it for a while with my second when it took him a good 7-10 minutes of off/on to get him latched and nursing at each feeding. Some moms like them because their babies are distracted in church or are loud nursers. Great. Some moms find even these rooms hard to use because there are other mothers and babies in there and it makes them uncomfortable. While I don’t necessarily feel that way myself I can understand how a mom might feel that way. No matter the reason a mom chooses to nurse in the sanctuary, the nursing room, the nursery or wherever, I think that is her choice and it is okay. If a mom feels uncomfortable nursing in any of the following places or lacks a place in her church where she does feel comfortable, I think it is her job to persue finding a comfortable place. Talk with the head of the children’s education or childcare committee. Talk to the deacons and elders. Talk with your pastor and your pastor’s wife. No matter what churches are for the people who attend them. Nursing is not on the list of activities that are non-compatible with spirituality or church. If a church isn’t meeting that need, ask around. How are other churches in your area dealing with this issue? Is the issue space? Misplaced modesty? Mother’s desire to have a more private area? Whatever it is, if you are making a long term commitment to nursing and to that particular church it’s well worth it to figure out who can help you find a solution to that situation.[]

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